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Don’t panic! You can combat math anxiety

Math anxiety affects both your emotional health and academics. It is a feeling of tension, helplessness and loss of self-confidence when approaching a math problem, math equation or math test. Panic attack symptoms include freezing up, sweating or experiencing increased blood pressure and nervousness.

Don't let math anxiety get the best of you. (Credit: Mary Lou Baker)

Don’t let math anxiety get the best of you. (Credit: Mary Lou Baker)

This math test anxiety can lead to avoidance of math classes, poor preparation and ill feelings toward anything related to math. Here are some ways to learn how to stop anxiety over math for better student health. Read more

Are online courses right for you? Learn the pros and cons

Online college courses and degree programs have become more common in recent years. Taking classes online is an alternative for college students and working adults to pursue their education. More than 7 million people enrolled in online courses last year.

Find out whether online courses are right for you. (Credit: QuickMeme.com)

Find out whether online courses are right for you. (Credit: QuickMeme.com)

Some educators praise online learning for improving study habits and responsibility, while others decry online courses for not offering a mentor or personal interaction with an instructor. Here is some need to know information about online classes for your personal student success. Read more

Women in STEM fields: Academics and mentoring

The percentage of women studying STEM fields (science, technology, engineering and math) in colleges is low—just 19 percent. STEM is often seen in academics as a boy’s club, and many colleges are having trouble attracting and retaining women in science and technology. Here are some ways colleges are encouraging women to study STEM and how an effective and sympathetic mentor can help them graduate.

The percentage of women studying STEM fields is low, some colleges are finding ways to change that. (Credit: Research Matters)

The percentage of women studying STEM fields is low, some colleges are finding ways to change that. (Credit: Research Matters)

Women underrepresented in STEM

Although women lead men in college enrollment and graduation rates, men still vastly outnumber women in the number of graduates in STEM fields. Read more

Ethnic and gender bias found in college mentorship requests

Student success in academics should not be based on race or gender. Yet in a recent study, researchers found ethnic and gender discrimination in professors’ responses to requests from doctoral students for counseling and mentorship. In scholarly articles on recent study findings, sociology researchers are offering ways to counter racial and gender bias.

A recent study shows the existence of ethnic and gender bias and can affect student success. (Credit: John Dawson)

A recent study shows the existence of ethnic and gender bias and can affect student success. (Credit: John Dawson)

Study: professors asked for mentorship

The study was conducted by Katherine Milkman, assistant professor of operations and information management at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School, with collaborators Modupe Akinola of Columbia University and Dolly Chugh of New York University. Read more

Research topic on fraternity houses: Campus fun vs. safety

Recent news reveals a negative connotation of fraternity houses.

Recent news reveals a negative connotation of fraternity houses.

A recent article in The Atlantic magazine by Caitlin Flanagan revealed a disturbing picture of dangerous campus life and misogynistic behavior at fraternity houses at American colleges. Often drunk young men perpetrate crimes of violence and sexual abuse all in the name of brotherhood and machismo. Flanagan’s article exposes the disregard for campus safety and student health by a few college students who care more about partying than academics.

The cover photo of the February 19, 2014 issue of The Atlantic features two frat boys chest bumping each other, letting out a primal scream and spilling their red Solo cups of beer. After a year-long investigation, Flanagan wrote the lengthy article, “The Dark Power of Fraternities” about the devastating events happening at fraternity houses. Read more

Colleges use data mining to achieve student advantage

Algorithms support the data mining process. (Credit: Jupiterimages/Getty Images)

Algorithms support the data mining process. (Credit: Jupiterimages/Getty Images)

Spurred on by the problems of high student debt, colleges and universities in the past few years have resorted to data mining to improve academics and college GPA and to increase their graduation rates. Student advantage spikes after schools guide college students toward a degree program that will better help them graduate.

We all know we’re leaving a data trail, on our Facebook page, in our Google dealings, at Starbucks and through our credit card transactions. Now colleges and universities are using “big data” to decide what degree you should get. In an effort to derail failing students and put them on a path more conducive to passing and flourishing, colleges are employing data gathering systems to record freshmen’s Likes, clicks, scores and answers. Read more

The importance of college GPA in finding a job

Be proud to display your high GPA on your resume when job searching.

Be proud to display your high GPA on your resume when job searching.

Academics is one important part of student success in college and student advantage when looking for a job after graduation. When you graduate, your college transcript plays an important role in getting the job of your choice and your desired salary. But many say GPA is not the only consideration, citing job experience and internships as also important. 

GPA matters more than you think

A common misconception is that once you pass the grueling admissions process and finally get into a prominent or prestigious college or university, you can have your pick of jobs after you graduate, no matter what your grades are. Don’t count on it. Many employers want to see your GPA on your résumé, and they use GPA to screen out low achievers. Read more