Questia’s Most Valuable Professor Competition — Nominate an MVP

While Mike-Vinny-Pauly might be the ultimate shore pick-up crew, which professor has helped you pick up the best education? Nominate your favorite professor for MVPMost Valuable Professor — and you’ll automatically be entered to win one of three $50 Visa gift cards!
Questia MVP — Most Valuable Professor Competition

College scholarships created in honor of MVP!

For the grand prize, Questia, the premier online library and research tool for students, will establish three $2,500 scholarships in the winning professor’s name, and the reigning MVP will help select the scholarship recipients. Scholarship criteria will be determined at a later date with input from the MVP. What better way to honor an educator than to give back to education!

Nominating a professor is easy

Visit Questia’s Facebook page and tell us why your professor deserves the Most Valuable Professor title in just 400 characters or less.

Doesn’t your favorite professor deserve to be in MVP status with NBA MVP Derrick Rose, NL MVP Ryan Braun and AL MVP Justin Verlander?

“Valuable professors not only educate students on their subject of expertise, but provide students with tools and lessons they can apply to real life situations,” says Joe Miller, Chief Researcher at Questia. “We probably don’t thank them enough. Nominating a special professor is a wonderful opportunity for students to elevate an unsung hero to MVP.”

What students have said about their personal MVPs

About Professor Zafar Iqba and Professor Hank Rodkin at DePaul University:

“Zafar and Hank exemplify what it means to look out for the goals and futures of students. They taught me the value of building a network, helping others succeed, and connecting people with like interests for future success. Zafar works with the DePaul IME Program, and his influence on the members of that program shows for years beyond graduation.”

About Professor Neal Houze at Purdue University:

“I’m grateful to Professor Houze because his classes made me realize that I could graduate (I did in 1999) with a chemical engineering degree and use the problem solving techniques he taught to apply to anything (not just engineering) and that yes, indeed, engineers can be well-rounded and have a sense of humor.”

About Richard Castaldi at San Francisco State University:

“To many that didn’t pass his class, he was the one thing that stood in the way from you and your degree. It was a serious class, it was a realistic class. He exposed us to what it would be like to work in the professional world. The fluff that got us through other classes didn’t fly with him. He pushed us to be polished and I will always be grateful to him for that.”

Submit your own nominations now!

Competition timeline

  • Nominations will be accepted through April 18.
  • Following the nomination period, a jury of Questia’s researchers will select the top ten professors based on student testimonials.
  • Voting will then be open to the public for a week starting April 23 to determine which of the top ten professors will ultimately receive Questia’s National Title of MVP!
  • The winner will be announced on April 30. Follow it all on Facebook.

Rules

  • All nominations will be vetted. Only legitimate professors may be submitted for consideration in order for us to find and notify them if they make the top 10 finalists.
  • You will not be eligible for the $50 Visa gift card with fraudulent or invalid entries.
  • When voting begins, you may vote for each finalist once per day.

In a recent survey, Questia asked students who they turn to first for trustworthy academic advice, and more than half said it was a professor. When asked who their college mentor is, the majority also said it was a professor. It seems as though professors are a go-to source for more than just homework questions—they are advisors, mentors and MVPs!