Celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month: Free content on famous Hispanic authors

Miguel de Cervantes

Miguel de Cervantes

In honor of Hispanic Heritage Month, we at Questia, the premier online research and paper-writing tool for students, are paying homage to Hispanic authors who have made significant contributions to literature throughout history. For the entire month, enjoy free access to reference works on five of history’s most researched Hispanic authors:

  1. Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra: Spanish-born Cervantes is widely regarded as an influential playwright, novelist and poet in history, penning infamous works such as Don Quixote during his lifetime. As a student under the direction of Juan Lopez de Hoyos, Cervantes published his first works, a collection of four poems. For a portion of his life, Cervantes lived a military-lifestyle, eventually being held prisoner in Algiers for many years.  Upon his release from captivity, Cervantes solidified his reputation as an author and authored many more novels. [Mancing, Howard.  The Cervantes Encyclopedia, Vol. 1 A-K.  Greenwood Press: 2004]
  1. Gabriel Garcia Marquez: Marquez is among the most recognized Spanish American authors of the 20th Century and is primarily associated with his novel One Hundred Years of Solitude. At the age of 12, the Colombian-born Marquez obtained a scholarship to study at Colegio Nacional, a national secondary school, and eventually went on to study law. While working as a journalist for a newspaper, Marquez began to publish his first works, many of which were short stories. As his works gained notoriety throughout his life, Marquez found fame and came to make many famous and powerful friends. [Pelayo, Ruben. Gabriel Garcia Marquez: A Critical Companion. Greenwood Press: 2001]
  1. Federico Garcia Lorca: Internationally recognized as a poet and playwright, Lorca’s tumultuous personal life and anguish was visible in many of his works.  Born in Spain, Lorca collaborated with many artists throughout Spain on various plays. However, strained relationships with friends such as Salvador Dali led Lorca to make his way over to the United States where he enrolled at Colombia University and authored the poem Poet in New York. Lorca eventually returned to Spain and was murdered in the Spanish Civil War. [Nandorfy, Martha J. The Poetics of Apocalypse: Federico Garcia Lorca’s Poet in New York. Bucknell University Press: 2003]
  1. Pablo Neruda: Born as Ricardo Eliecer Neftali Reyes Basoalto in Chile, he often used the pen name Pablo Neruda for his politically-charged prose and poems and eventually took the alias as his legal name. Throughout his life, Neruda became an internationally recognized figure for his involvement in politics, however in his youth he authored many poems such as the erotically-fueled Twenty Love Poems and a Song of Despair. [Belitt, Ben.  The Forged Feature: Towards a Poetics of Uncertainty: New and Selected Essays. Fordham University Press: 1995]
  1. Jorge Luis Borges: An Argentinean poet and short-story writer, Borges was a master of the written word with his writing first beginning in Europe where he received a baccalaureat from the College de Geneve in Switzerland. In his Autobiographical Essay Borges reminisces about how his involvement in literary tertulia while living in Madrid and how participating in conversations about different essays became a pivotal point within his writing career. Borges is most remembered for his poetry and fictional essays that contained fantasy and magical realism themes. [De Quevedo, Francisco. Six Masters of the Spanish Sonnet: Essays and Translations.  Southern Illinois University Press: 1997]

Find further research on famous Hispanic authors on Questia.

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