Our collection just keeps getting bigger!

Questia has just added over 2,000 new book titles to its collection. Check out these featured books that we have made free for a limited time.

Want to see more? Get full access to these books and more by joining Questia today!
Click here to see a complete listing of all the newly added book titles.

"Spying Blind: The CIA, the FBI, and the Origins of 9/11" By: Amy B. Zegart

"Spying Blind: The CIA, the FBI, and the Origins of 9/11" By: Amy B. Zegart

"The Road to Dallas: The Assassination of John F. Kennedy" By: David Kaiser

"The Road to Dallas: The Assassination of John F. Kennedy" By: David Kaiser

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

"Brain Sense: The Science of the Senses and How We Process the World Around Us" By: Faith Hickman Brynie

"Brain Sense: The Science of the Senses and How We Process the World Around Us" By: Faith Hickman Brynie

"Scorsese by Ebert" By: Roger Ebert

"Scorsese by Ebert" By: Roger Ebert

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

43 replies
  1. Graham Anassah Morgan says:

    Thanks for the information on the update of the library books.

    I would appreciate if you can upload Science books especially Nursing Journals or any other related articles on Health..Since I am a Science student udertaking Nursing, I am much in need of some Nursing Journals to do my research..

    Your help would be appreciated and am looking forword to hear from you

    Yours Faithfully,

    Graham A Morgan

    Reply
  2. ferl says:

    can you please include books about veterinary medicine.
    having a really hard time to get some here in our place.,thank you so much.,!
    more power and God bless!

    Reply
  3. Larry says:

    I would like see more books about American history, especially old books (1850-1950). I also appreciate “new studies” published recently (1950-2012). I would like see the complete 10 Volume-set of George Bancroft’s History of the United States, particularly. Some questions: why works in volumes are often not complete? Are missing volumes planned for the future? Thanks, because Questia has changed my life and method as a student and researcher. Long life to Questia!

    Reply
    • Gary Jeppsen - Senior Product Manager of Questia says:

      Larry, regarding your inquiry on George Bancroft’s History of the United States, we are in the process of acquiring that complete volume set. In general, our volume sets are assembled based on the volumes we are able to acquire and user interest. We handle these on a case-by-case basis. If there are specific volumes of interest to you, please provide us with that feedback so we can take that into consideration with our content review. Thank you.

      Reply
      • Larry says:

        Hello, Gary. A big news, about Bancroft, indeed. Yes, I’m thinking of other titles very important for my future feedbacks here. Thanks.

        Reply
  4. Larry says:

    Please, I have some suggestions. In “History” – “Categories” – “Unites States History” – “U.S. States and Cities”: not all the 50 States are present with a ‘general history’. For example: to search “South Dakota history” you must go on “North Dakota history’. It would be wonderful if “all the 50 States” had its “general history’, such as “History of …”, with this ‘specific’ title, I mean.

    Reply
    • Gary Jeppsen - Senior Product Manager of Questia says:

      Thank you for the suggestion. We create categories based upon user interest and editorial review as a summary of books and articles that support it. Please keep in mind that if we do not have a category topic displayed, we still are likely have books or articles about that topic. For example, as you discovered, we don’t have a category specific to South Dakota. However, entering South Dakota into our search engine generates hundreds of results. Thank you again for the feedback. Please keep it coming. We appreciate it.

      Reply
      • Larry says:

        Hello, Gary. Yes, I usually use the so-called ‘General Engine’ and, above all, ‘Advanced Research’. You said: “Please, keep it coming”. I wonder: are my suggestions important about new titles to add to the library? Ok, if you like, I’m ready to give you other titles for the future. Another question. About zoom (+) there are only ‘two levels’ on the page now. Well, we need a third one at least: characters are too small sometimes; (not only HTML format on old books, but alto on BETA format of new books); I’m saying that as an improvement of the site. Thanks.

        Reply
  5. Larry says:

    Hello. As you know, the authors mentioned here are the “cream” of the United States culture, so important that 1960’s, and 70’s historians wrote their books on the basis of the works of these “scholars”. Here is a list of titles and authors for the library: “Formation of the Union, 1750-1829”, by Albert Bushnell Hart, professor at Harvard — “Annals of America” (Vol. 2; Vol. 1 already present on Questia), by Abiel Holmes, a congregational clergyman from Yale College — “History of Historical Writing in America”, four lectures delivered by Dr. John Franklin Jameson (also president of the American Historical Association) at Brown University in 1891, very important for historians and researchers, and for the study of historical writing in America — “The Colonies, 1492-1750”, by Reuben Gold Thwaites, secretary of the Wisconsin Historical Society, who, with Frederick Jackson Turner, Louise P. Kellogg, and Frederig Austin Ogg, belonged to the so-called “Wisconsin school” (there was a “rivalry” between them and the “New Englanders” about writing history because the latter didn’t write about the Mississippi and Ohio Valleys history at that time), the latter two already present on Questia — Francis Parkman’s works (four works only on Questia: “The Conspiracy of Pontiac”, “Jesuits in North America in the Seventeenth Century”, “Pioneers of France in the New World” and “The Oregon Trail”), but there are others belonging to this “western series”, such us:; “La Salle and the Discovery of the Great West; “The Old Régime in Canada”; “Count Frontenac and New France under Louis XIV”; “Montcalm and Wolfe”; “Half Century of Conflict”, Vols. 1 and 2; “The Journals of Francis Parkman”, (2 Vols.); “The Letters of Francis Parkman”, (2 Vols.); “History of the United States”, 6 Vols. by Elisha Benjamin Andrews, president of Brown University; “History of the United States”, 6 Vols. by Edward Channing, professor at Harvard (Vols. 1 and 2 already on Questia). “Our Whole Country”, by John Warner Barber, an American engraver (2 Vols.); “History of New England”, (5 Vols., but Vol. 1 already present on Questia), by John Gorham Palfrey, a clergyman and U.S. Representative from Massachusetts. These are only some “suggestions of mine”, of course. Thanks.

    Reply
  6. Larry (Lorenzo) says:

    Hello, yesterday, in my feedback, I have forgotten another “great” of the ” academic world of the United States”: Columbia University professor Evarts Boutell Greene and his “The Foundations of American Nationality”. Vol. 1 is already present on Questia, but not Vol. 2. I’m also thinking of titles about Western Literature. I have seen some titles of Zane Grey’s (the most famous Western author — very few), but it would be wonderful see more. However, there is another “great author” to take into consideration: Ernest Haycox. Who is he? Well, the biggest author in the United States. “John Ford and John Wayne would not exist without Ernest Haycox!” Why? Well, when in the 1880’s Guy de Maupassant wrote “Boule-the-Suif”, Ernest Haycox, born in Portland, Oregon, was inspired by it and he wrote “Stage to Lordsburg”; John Ford and John Wayne were inspired by “Stage to Lordsburg”, so “Stagecoach” (the movie) was based on this short-story. At this point, it would be wonderful see some works of Ernest Haycox. Thanks.

    Reply
  7. Larry (Lorenzo Bernardotto - It.) says:

    Other titles by Carl Lotus Becker, professor at Cornell University, not present on Questia: “The Beginnings of American People”; “Our Great Experiment in Democracy” — John Fiske, the great philosopher; works wanted: “The Dutch and Quaker Colonies in America” (Vol. 1 only present on Questia, but not Vol. 2); “The Beginnings of New England”; “The Discovery of America (2 Vols.); “Old Virginia and Her Neighbors” — Charles McLean Andrews, professor at Yale and Johns Hopkins universities: the series is almost complete on Questia, but there is not “The Colonial Period of American History” (4 Vols.), his masterpiece. I want to say these authors (in this message and in my previous ones as LARRY) are often mentioned in “modern” American history journals and articles. I think the epoch between 1850’s and 1930’s has been legendary about American history writing and literature. Some modern historians think they were “a little nationalist” in thought and writing, but, in my opinion, it’s normal, because some of them lived in a nationalist epoch. But they are still a “point of reference” for present scholars to understand the matter. Of course, it’s only my personal opinion for a man, like me, who is a small author of Western short-stories (they aren’t important and not publishable), and a small student very keen on American history. Indeed, I have been devoting my entire life to the United States (I began my personal studies in 1976, at the age of 17).

    Reply
  8. Gary Jeppsen - Senior Product Manager of Questia says:

    Larry, thank you for taking the time to share your suggestions. We will take them into consideration when we review our library content, which we do periodically throughout the year. Users like you help us make Questia better. We really appreciate it.

    Reply
    • Larry (Lorenzo Bernardotto - It.) says:

      Ok, Gary. I’m happy to share my suggestions with you and your staff. If I have new titles I will give you them in the future. Thanks.

      Reply
  9. Larry (Lorenzo Bernardotto - It.) says:

    Two titles: “The American Revolution in Indian Country”, by Colin G. Calloway, professor at Dartmouth College. “Great Epochs in American History” (10 Vols.), by Francis W. Halsey, a journalist, editor, and historian.

    Reply
  10. Larry (Lorenzo Bernardotto - It.) says:

    Professor Gordon S. Wood is a great modern professor at Brown University. One book only of him on Questia: (“A Matter of Interpretation: Federal Courts and the Law: An Essay”). But there are other titles very important about American history such as: “The Creation of the American Republic”, “Representation in the American Revolution”; “The Rising Glory of America, 1760-1820″; “The Confederation and the Constitution”; “Revolution and the Political Integration of the Enslaved and Disenfranchised”; “Leadership in the American Revolution”; “Social Radicalism and the Idea of Equality in the American Revolution”; “The Great Republic”; “The Making of the Constitution”; “The Radicalism of the American Revolution”; “Russian-American Dialogue on the American Revolution”; “Creation of the American Republic: 1776-1787″; “Imagined Histories: American Historians Interpret the Past”; “Monarchism and Republicanism in the Early United States”; “The American Revolution: A History”; “The Americanization of Benjamin Franklin”; “Revolutionary Characters: What Made the Founders Different”; “The Purpose of the Past: Reflections on the Uses of History”; “Empire of Liberty: A History of the Early Republic, 1789-1815″. It would be interesting this series on Questia.

    Reply
  11. Larry (Lorenzo Bernardotto - It.) says:

    Richard White is a modern historian, President of the Organization of American Historians and Professor at Stanford University. Two titles: “The Middle Ground: Indians, Empires, and Republics in the Great Lakes Region, 1650-1815″ (his most famous one), and “It’s Your Misfortune and None of My Own: A History of the American West”.

    Reply
  12. Larry (Lorenzo Bernardotto - It.) says:

    Gary Nash is an historian of the Revolutionary period and Professor at UCLA (University of California, Los Angeles). Some titles of him: “Quakers and Politics: Pennsylvania, 1681-1726″, “Class and Society in Early America”, “Red, White, and Black: The Peoples of Early America”; “The Private Side of American History: Readings in Everyday Life”, “The Urban Crucible: Social Change, Political Consciousness, and the Origins of the American Revolution”; “Race, Class, and Politics: Essays on American Colonial and Revolutionary Society”; “Forging Freedom: The Formation of Philadelphia’s Black Community 1720-1840″; “Race and Revolution: The Inaugural Merrill Jensen Lectures”; “First City: “Philadelphia and the Forging of Historical Memory”; “The Unknown American Revolution: The Unruly Birth of Democracy and the Struggle to Create America”.

    Reply
  13. Larry (Lorenzo Bernardotto - It.) says:

    Jared Sparks was an historian and President of Harvard University. His most famous work is “The Diplomatic Correspondence of the American Revolution” (12 Vols.).

    Reply
  14. Larry (Lorenzo Bernardotto - It.) says:

    Francis Jennings, historian and teacher at Cedar Crest College. One of his titles not on Questia: “Invasion of America: Indians, Colonialism, and the Cant of Conquest”.

    Reply
  15. Larry (Lorenzo Bernardotto - It.) says:

    I like the new Questia system. Only that … why some works have been deleted? Is it due to copyright or technical problems? Thanks.

    Reply
  16. Larry (Lorenzo Bernardotto - It.) says:

    American literature. I have seen A. B. Guthrie on Questia (“Montana, High, Wide, and Handsome”, but this author is famous for his “The Big Sky”, where a boy from Kentucky leaves his native place and goes west. He becomes a mountain man. It’s a great book, in my opinion, where events and, above all, nature, are described in a wonderful way. A great classic Western. I have my Italian paper copy and version, but I recommend an English version for other readers on Questia.

    Reply
  17. Larry (Lorenzo Bernardotto - It.) says:

    I was thinking of Laura Ingalls Wilder and her “Little House” tales. Yes, it’s children literature, but it also contains a wide passage of American tradition and history of the so-called “Old Northwest” (present Northwest Territory — Wisconsin and Minnesota, particularly).

    Reply
  18. Larry (Lorenzo Bernardotto - It.) says:

    There is a book I want to mention: “Howard Zinn on War, Terrorism and War”. It’s a collection of essays and journal articles Professor Zinn, who was political science professor at Boston University, about the “absurdity” of all the wars in the world and terrorism. I think this book is very thoughtful.

    Reply
  19. Larry (Lorenzo Bernardotto - It.) says:

    Robert Leckie, knows military history very well. During WWII, he entered the United States Marine Corps and served in the Pacific theater. There are three books of his which deserve to appear on Questia Library, in my opinion: 1) “George Washington’s War: The Saga of the American Revolution”; 2) “From Sea to Shining Sea: From the War of 1812 to the Mexican-American War, the Saga of America’s Expansion”; and 3) “The Wars of America: From 1600 to 1900″ (2 Vols.). The first one, is the long political and military history of the American Revolution; it contains all the main battles and small skirmishes, as well as, biographical sketches of the main political and military leaders. The second one, deals with the Barbary Wars against Algeria and Libya (ca. 1805-1816), the War of 1812 (1812-1814) which scholars also call “The Second American War of Independence”, and the Mexican War (1846-1848), which marks the so-called “Manifest Destiny” of the United States, that is, the territorial expansion from the Mississippi Valley to the West Coast, and western territories. The third one, is a compedium of the books above-mentioned. Very in-depth works! A scholar must have these books in his personal library!

    Reply
  20. Larry (Lorenzo Bernardotto - It.) says:

    Denis Lacorne, is a French author and historian. He is the director of Fondation Nationale des Sciences Politiques and wrote two books about the United States: 1) “La Crise de L’Identité Américaine”, and 2) “Le Modèle Américain”. In “La Crise de L’Identité Américaine”, he says: “The United States are an immigrant country by tradition where a plurality of ethnic groups meet one another. But there is the problem of violence, exclusion, racism, and xenophobia.” According to a critic, this is a paradox, because, being the United States a nation split socially, they have an amazing capability of social integration. Lacorne, analyzes, through three centuries of American multiculturalism, these questions in his book, namely: tolerance, refusal of foreigners, and cohabitation among different cultures.

    Reply
  21. Larry (Lorenzo Bernardotto - It.) says:

    Robert D. Putnam, is a professor of political science at Harvard University. His book, “Bowling alone. The Collapse and Revival of American Community” is very controversial because it deals with the collapse in civic, social, associational and political life in the United States. He calls all that “social capital”. In his opinion, this “collapse” began in the 1960’s. In his book, he analyzes the “social change” and the “quality of democracy”.

    Reply
  22. Larry (Lorenzo Bernardotto - It.) says:

    I was thinking of … “America”, written by Alistair Cooke. As a 53-years-old, I have my 1976-Italian edition, but I think it would be useful find it on Questia for other users. Indeed, when I write these messages, I also think “not only of myself, but also of other readers” who possibly like the subject. Alistair Cooke, was a BBC correspondent who lived in the United States in the 1940’s. “America”, is only a “general history” of the United States, but, I think, young generation could start their “literary course”, along their life, to “follow the subject”, I mean. “America”, is very engaging and well-written, and I read it just in 1976, when I was 17. It has been the “one of the first books in my life”. “America” also contains many pictures. As usual, it begins with Columbus’s voyages and comes to the Vietnam War and early 1970’s. (I don’t know if there are up-to-date editions). But I recommend it.

    Reply
  23. Larry (Lorenzo Bernardotto - It.) says:

    Peter Burke, a British historian and professor, is one of the most authoritative European historians. His book “History and Social Theory” deserves attention.

    Reply
  24. Larry (Lorenzo Bernardotto - It.) says:

    Ian K. Steele, author of “Warpath – Invasions of North America”, has written another work. It’s entitled “The English Atlantic, 1675-1740″. This work deals with the English Atlantic context of early American life; Caribbean and the ice-locked Hudson Bay maritime communications; the political, economic, and social integration of the English Atlantic between 1675 and 1740; a description of the influence of physical, technological, socioeconomic, and political aspects of seaborne communication on the community. A new analysis of Colonial history.

    Reply
  25. Larry (Lorenzo Bernardotto - It.) says:

    Robert Olwell and Alan Tully, are two professors of early American history at the University of Texas, Austin. They edited a book entitled “Cultures and Identities in Colonial British America”. It deals with the development of American society. Scholars thinks this work is very useful for students in this discipline. It belongs to a three-volume series edited by Jack P. Greene.

    Reply
  26. Larry (Lorenzo Bernardotto - It.) says:

    I would like suggest this book: “Indians and British Outposts in Eighteenth-Century America” (2012), by Daniel Ingram. This books give us a new perspective about the British forts in colonial America. The author sees them more as “communities” than as “military outposts” in indian country. There was a good relation between Indians and soldiers who lived inside these forts and there was also a kind of “economic e social life” between the “two groups”. This meant “security”. Ingram also used British official records to write his book, but he also covered archaeology and ethnography. He analyzed five forts and they were influenced by the Native Americans very much.

    Reply
  27. Larry (Lorenzo Bernardotto - It.) says:

    “Colonial America: A Very Short Introduction”, by Alan Taylor, reminds me of Charles McLean Andrews, the great historian of the American past. Easy to read, this book takes the reader on a journey through the past. Prof. Taylor, accompanies us through a long period of American history: from pre-Columbian America to the end of the Seven Year’s War. His simple writing style allows us to understand all aspects of colonial history. For scholars of this discipline (colonial period).

    Reply
  28. Larry (Lorenzo Bernardotto - It.) says:

    This collection is entitled “Our Collection Just Keeps Bigger”, that is, we must point out “new books”. Well, “Atlantic History: A Critical Appraisal”, by Jack P. Greene and Philip D. Morgan is already on Questia Library. But I also would like write my “impression” about books. I’m writing because I think this is a “great volume”. On the other hand, Jack P. Greene never disappoint us, belonging to the “old school” of American historians! This book is not only a volume on American colonial history, but it also deals with four continents: the Americas (North and South), Europe and Africa. We can find not only the British and French history in the Atlantic world, but also the Spanish and Portuguese, the story of African empires and their role in the Atlantic perspective. Personally, I think the scholars or those who are keen on colonial history must read this book. It’s a long and wonderful journey through about three centuries of European conquest, westward and southward movement, a book not only on North America, the Caribbean, and the West Indies, but also about the Spanish conquest of the future states of South America, the slave trade in West Africa. In short, a book to enjoy line by line.

    Reply
      • Larry (Lorenzo Bernardotto - It.) says:

        Hello, Nicole.

        Thank you. I’m happy to share my literary thoughts with you. Questia keeps me company. When I have new books to suggest to the so-called “colonial American history club”, that is, those who are keen on this discipline, I will write.

        Reply
          • Larry (Lorenzo Bernardotto - It.) says:

            Hello, Nicole.

            Colonial history also means the American Revolution. Well, I would like to talk about a book entitled “La Rivoluzione Americana”, edited in 1977 by Prof. Tiziano Bonazzi. In 1963 Prof. Bonazzi took a degree in law at the University of Bologna; his thesis was on Philosophy of Law. He also took a degree in American Studies at the Johns Hopkins University Bologna Center. In 1965-1966 he was Special Graduate Student at the University of Rochester, N.Y., Department of History. Why am I suggesting this book? Well, there is a personal brief story. In 1977, I was 18 and this age symbolizes my first steps in the journey through American history. I had begun a year before, in the summer of 1976, at 17. Since then, I covered some miles (39 years devoted entirely to the United States — but the journey is still long — for a man self-educated at home like me, English language included — by the way, I apologize to you in advance if my English isn’t perfect). Well, after this brief introduction, I’m reviewing the book. “La Rivoluzione Americana”, is a collection of essays written not only by Jack P. Greene, but also by other “myths” such as Gary B. Nash and Bernard Bailyn. For instance, after a long introduction by Prof. Bonazzi, the book starts with JACK P. GREENE (Johns Hopkins University; Michigan State University; Western Reserve University; University of Michigan; Duke University) who analyzes “A RESTLESS RELATION: THE PRECONDITION OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION”. After him, MARC EGNAL (York University, Toronto, Canada; Swarthmore College; University of Wisconsin-Madison) talks about “THE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT OF THE AMERICAN THIRTEEN COLONIES, FROM 1720 TO 1775”. The third essay has been written by JACKSON TURNER MAIN (1917-2003), the grandson of the “great” Frederick Jackson Turner! He was born in Chicago, but grew up in Madison, Wisconsin. Well, Main talks about the “THE SOCIAL MOBILITY IN COLONIAL AMERICA”. Again JACK P. GREENE in the fourth essay: “THE ROLE OF THE ASSEMBLY IN THE EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY AMERICAN POLITICS”. At this point, in the fifth essay, we have the “legendary” GARY B. NASH (Princeton University) who analyzes “THE TRANSFORMATION OF URBAN POLITICS, FROM 1700 TO 1765”. The sixth essay has been written by RICHARD RYERSON, and it deals with “THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION AND THE ORIGIN OF MODERN AMERICAN POLITICS”. After him, as a seventh essay, we have another “legendary man”: Bernard Bailyn (Harvard University; Williams College)! He talks about “THE LOGIC OF THE REBELLION”. We must get excited now! Why? Because the eighth essay has been written by “another great man”: GORDON S. WOOD (College of William and Mary; Harvard University; University of Michigan; Brown University; Cambridge University; Northwestern University School of Law; Tufts University!) In fact, he has written about “THE REPUBLICAN IDEOLOGY OF THE REVOLUTION”. The ninth essay has been written by HARRY S. STOUT (Kent State University); it deals with “RELIGION, COMMUNICATION, AND THE IDEOLOGICAL ORIGIN OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION”. Instead, JOAN HEFF WILSON has written the tenth essay about “THE ILLUSION OF THE CHANGE: WOMEN AND THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION”. The eleventh and last essay has been written by JEFFREY J. CROW, and it deals with “REBELLIOUS SLAVES AND SOCIAL CONFLICT IN NORTH CAROLINA, FROM 1775 TO 1802.

            Thank you, Nicole!

          • Nicole Reinard says:

            You’re welcome, Larry! Thank you for all of the extra information you’ve been sharing too!

  29. Larry (Lorenzo Bernardotto - It.) says:

    Hello, Nicole.

    Before my next article about the Jacksonian era, I’m posting some lines of a short-story of mine (the only one written in English! A hard work for me!). It’s entitled “A GLORIOUS DAY FOR ABIGAIL SEYMOUR” (by Farmer John -C- 2003). Of course, I’m more a “reader” than a “writer”. On the contrary, “I’m not a writer” (the real writers usually attend university). I wrote this story only for me as a avocation. It’s a story set in western Massachusetts where four heroines (women) are fighting in the American Revolution. This time, I have a “pen name”, that is, Farmer John, Enjoy you and the staff!

    A GLORIUS DAY FOR
    ABIGAIL SEYMOUR
    by Farmer John
    (pen name of Lorenzo Bernardotto)
    (C) 2003

    Winter of 1777, Amherst, Western Massachusetts, the cold season wrapped in its icy cloak the Massachusetts’s lonely small town; it was a harsh winter and it even froze the Connecticut River.(1) It was west of few houses; they were six miles from the frontier village and they were like Abigail Seymour’s small home. Abigail was a charming and middle-aged woman; she was tall, brown-haired and she was the wife of heroic General Horatio Gates who was engaged elsewhere to free his country from the British’s yoke. Massachusetts was occupied by the soldiers of His Majesty.(2) After Lexington and Concord clashes, April 19, 1775 (3) and the battle at Bunker Hill (4), the front shifted into New York and New Jersey and on that period, after the disaster of Fort Washington (5), the Continental Army (6) was fighting in Trenton (7) and Princeton (8). Massachusetts was far as well as the humble home of Abigail Seymour.
    *****
    Abigail was sitting in a rocker near her fireplace; she was knitting a scarf for her husband when she heard the hoofs of a horse pawing the ground, galloping towards her home. The woman instinctively dropped her work from her hands and she rushed toward a chest; she seized a pistol and she hid behind a window.
    “Who is it?”, she asked in a threatening voice; and she drew a curtain.
    “Allen, Rufus Allen. Hello, Abigail!”
    The woman opened the door. “Rufus,” she cried with a smile on her lips. “What is the visit due to?”
    “I brought you a supply of meat,” the man answered; and he unladed a doe; it was shot by a bullet of his firelock (firestone rifle).
    “Come in,” said the woman and she tidied her hair.
    The trapper took off his tricorn hat and he passed his hand over his greasy and gray hair. Rufus Allen was a tall and thin man; he had a gray beard and sleek hair. He fought with the Minutemen (9) of John Parker (10) at Lexington in spring two years before. Rufus Allen was a patriot of the American cause; his home was requisitioned by the British with the Quartering Act (11); he was a primitive man now and he was living by hunting in the woods of Western Massachusetts. There was a deep friendship between the trapper and woman, because she always helped him on hard times; the hunter was nearly alone and she often invited him to her own home for a meal of a good bed where he could lay down his old bones. He was a great friend of her husband too, the General Horatio Gates (12) and he was under Gates’s command when Gates was a Freeman’s Farm and Bemis Heights (13) in fall. Allen was not married, because women never interested him; the trapper liked living all alone close to the nature in the woods and close to God and His creatures. He was at Abigail Seymour’s home now and it was stirring his heart.
    *****
    Abigail took a bottle of rum and a tankard and she laid them on the table.
    “Here’s Rufus, it will be warming you.”
    “Thanks Gail, you are an angel.”
    The woman blushed and she wiped her hands on her apron; then she got near the fireplace to poke the fire and she asked: “Did you see the British round here?”
    “No one,” he answered. “Are you worried?”
    “Yes, a little,” she anwered. “Oh, if only Horace were here …!”
    Abigail has hardly finished what she was saying when about 30 British dragoons (14) under the command of Major William Carrington came galloping and surrounding the house.
    “Rufus Allen,” a voice cried “come out with your hands up! We know you are here!”
    The trapper had a look outside, then he took his rifle and opened the door laying down the gun; then he put his hands up.
    “Rufus Allen, in the name of His Majesty, you are under arrest for treason,” the officer said.
    “Treason?”, Allen asked incredulously.
    “You are a spy,” the Major replied.
    And without saying a word two red coats (15) came up to the man; they tied his hands behind his back and they mounted him a saddled horse.
    “Where will you take him?”, the woman asked.
    The officer turned towards her. “To Amherst, Madam …” he answered courteously. He had a pause. “There he will be tried and hanged.”
    Abigail remained silent; but did the woman leave her friend to himself?

    If you and the staff like it, I can send the complete story (very short) to my American friends!

    See you soon!

    Reply
      • Larry (Lorenzo Bernardotto - It.) says:

        Ok, Nicole, thank you,

        Well, I would like to share my story entirely because I feel part of the American world. You will also find some historical notes at the the end of the text. In fact, this story is not only “fiction”, but also “American history”. Thus, “historical notes” are indispensable. Enjoy.

        A GLORIUS DAY FOR
        ABIGAIL SEYMOUR
        by Farmer John
        (C) 2003

        Winter of 1777, Amherst, Western Massachusetts, the cold season wrapped in its icy cloak the Massachusetts’s lonely small town; it was a harsh winter and it even froze the Connecticut River.(1) It was west of few houses; they were six miles from the frontier village and they were like Abigail Seymour’s small home. Abigail was a charming and middle-aged woman; she was tall, brown-haired and she was the wife of heroic General Horatio Gates who was engaged elsewhere to free his country from the British’s yoke. Massachusetts was occupied by the soldiers of His Majesty.(2) After Lexington and Concord clashes, April 19, 1775 (3) and the battle at Bunker Hill (4), the front shifted into New York and New Jersey and on that period, after the disaster of Fort Washington (5), the Continental Army (6) was fighting in Trenton (7) and Princeton (8). Massachu-setts was far as well as the humble home of Abigail Seymour.
        *****
        Abigail was sitting in a rocker near her fireplace; she was knitting a scarf for her hus-band when she heard the hoofs of a horse pawing the ground, galloping towards her home. The woman instinctively dropped her work from her hands and she rushed to-ward a chest; she seized a pistol and she hid behind a window.
        “Who is it?”, she asked in a threatening voice; and she drew a curtain.
        “Allen, Rufus Allen. Hello, Abigail!”
        The woman opened the door. “Rufus,” she cried with a smile on her lips. “What is the visit due to?”
        “I brought you a supply of meat,” the man answered; and he unladed a doe; it was shot by a bullet of his firelock (firestone rifle).
        “Come in,” said the woman and she tidied her hair.
        The trapper took off his tricorn hat and he passed his hand over his greasy and gray hair. Rufus Allen was a tall and thin man; he had a gray beard and sleek hair. He fought with the Minutemen (9) of John Parker (10) at Lexington in spring two years before. Rufus Allen was a patriot of the American cause; his home was requisitioned by the British with the Quartering Act (11); he was a primitive man now and he was living by hunting in the woods of Western Massachusetts. There was a deep friendship between the trap-per and woman, because she always helped him on hard times; the hunter was nearly alone and she often invited him to her own home for a meal of a good bed where he could lay down his old bones. He was a great friend of her husband too, the General Horatio Gates (12) and he was under Gates’s command when Gates was a Freeman’s Farm and Bemis Heights (13) in fall. Allen was not married, because women never in-terested him; the trapper liked living all alone close to the nature in the woods and close to God and His creatures. He was at Abigail Seymour’s home now and it was stirring his heart.
        *****
        Abigail took a bottle of rum and a tankard and she laid them on the table.
        “Here’s Rufus, it will be warming you.”
        “Thanks Gail, you are an angel.”
        The woman blushed and she wiped her hands on her apron; then she got near the fire-place to poke the fire and she asked: “Did you see the British round here?”
        “No one,” he answered. “Are you worried?”
        “Yes, a little,” she anwered. “Oh, if only Horace were here …!”
        Abigail has hardly finished what she was saying when about 30 British dragoons (14) under the command of Major William Carrington came galloping and surrounding the house.
        “Rufus Allen,” a voice cried “come out with your hands up! We know you are here!”
        The trapper had a look outside, then he took his rifle and opened the door laying down the gun; then he put his hands up.
        “Rufus Allen, in the name of His Majesty, you are under arrest for treason,” the officer said.
        “Treason?”, Allen asked incredulously.
        “You are a spy,” the Major replied.
        And without saying a word two red coats (15) came up to the man; they tied his hands behind his back and they mounted him a saddled horse.
        “Where will you take him?”, the woman asked.
        The officer turned towards her. “To Amherst, Madam …” he answered courteously. He had a pause. “There he will be tried and hanged.”
        Abigail remained silent; but did the woman leave her friend to himself?
        *****
        Abigail Seymour was a persevering and pugnacious woman. Next day, she rode six miles form her home to Amherst and she made for the house of one of her girl friends.
        Rebecca Coleridge was playing the harpsichord (16) when Abigail knocked at the door.
        “Abigail!”, Rebecca cried; she rose to her feet and ran up to her.
        “British captured Rufus. We must inform our townswomen,” Abigail said; she was pant-ing.
        “Where have they taken him?”, Rebecca asked.
        “Here, at Amherst. I’m going to Sarah Dillon and Mary Berkeley now.”
        “Don’t trouble, we already know it,” a voice said behind her.
        Sarah Dillon came by her horse; she had been riding on a dark night and she had es-caped the guards.
        “Mary is waiting us under the walls of the fortress. She persuaded one of the pickets and she will probably get into the prison this night.”
        Abigail Seymour, Rebecca Coleridge, Sarah Dillon and Mary Berkeley were the four women who founded the secret society of “Daughters of the Revolution”, an organiza-tion like the “Sons of Liberty” of Boston (17); it had hundreds of followers by now, both at Amherst and neighbouring villages; its seat was Mrs. Coleridge’s home.
        *****
        Rufus Allen was lying in a stinking and dark cell when a masked woman got near the bars; she took him the first hot meal; he had been eating stale bread and drinkin water for a week. The trapper recognized Mary Berkeley’s face.
        “Rufus, don’t utter a word! Do as I say!”, she whispered.
        Mary was courageous; she had persuaded the duty officer to let her in; the patriot woman had corrupted the red coat with pancakes and wine and she got a pass into the fortress od Amherst, an impregnable stronghold; it stood upon an unscalable hillock. Mary Berkeley was a very beautiful woman, to the point that she had been to captivate the jailer of the prisons; it was a sham love affair and she used it to rescue Rufus Allen from despotic British Colonel Anthony Fletcher, governor of Western Massachusetts’s four towns: Greenfield (18), Amherst (19), Northampton (20) and Springfield (21). But also Sarah Dillon and Rebecca Coleridge were charming. Their husbands had gone to the front, they both under the command of Gates at Freeman’s Farm and Bemis Heights. The four women were ready to free both Allen and they towns from British tiranny, so Mary Berkeley was the first move of a big game they had to play in that area.
        *****
        Mary Berkeley patiently waited for Rufus finish his square meal; then she called the jailer and she withdrew with him behind a wall not far from the cell. The trapper drew out a pistol from the small basket and hit in the nape of the neck the British soldier; then he escaped hand in hand with Mary through a long corridor. Suddenly two sentries no-ticed the escape and they raised alarm, but Rebecca Coleridge and Sarah Dillon hit those men and then they continued escaping outside the stronghold where Abigail Sey-mour with five horses hidden inside a not far thicket was waiting the fugitives. Allen was free at last and he and the four women made for the Abigail’s home; they only took food supplies and then the patriots hid inside a cavern; it was ten miles from the village among the woods and the trapper only knew it.
        Colonel Fletcher, meanwhile, set his soldiers on the tracks of man and the four women, but with no success, while Mary Berkeley, Rebecca Coleridge, Sarah Dillon and Abigail Seymour organized the Resistance.
        At Amherst, everyone knew the women were members of the secret society “Daughters of the Revolution”, but nobody knew they were also officers and proper “military chiefs” and no one knew the destiny of the town and neighbouring villages were in their hands.
        *****
        Rufus Allen, outside the cavern, was cleaning his firelock (firestone rifle) when he sud-denly heard a sound of fifes from the east. The trapped climbed a tree and he saw a Brit-ish patrol of about ten red coats; they were dangerously making for the cavern. He aimed instinctively his rifle, but fortunately the small squad went away; they reconnoi-tred the woods uselessly.
        “We must go away, they will spot us sooner or later,” said the women.
        “Rufus, we go away, you stay here,” Abigail answered him.
        The trapper stayed in hiding until the following spring; this was the aim of women.
        The British, meanwhile, didn’t find the fugitive in Abigail Seymour’s home and they set fire to the log cabin. Flames were rising high into the sky, under eyes and broken heart of the patriot woman; she was hidden not far, among the bushes of a hill.
        “I will make you regret,” she said livid with rage; and without saying a word, she re-turned to the cavern.
        *****
        Spring of 1778, the four towns of Massachusetts were in a state of ferment and the sen-timent of rebellion was rising. Abigail Seymour, Mary Berkeley, Rebecca Coleridge and Sarah Dillon were at Greenfield, Amherst, Northampton and Springfield respec-tively and from Greenfield village began the Revolution in Western Massachusetts. Abigail Seymour was going to attack the small town with an army of 500 patriots, while the other women, with the wives of the partisans, were going to try to capture the Brit-ish positions in the other towns lying to the south of it. Mary Berkeley had 150 women under her command; Rebecca Coleridge, 100 and Sarah Dillon, 50; but those wives were not sufficent to defeat the British. The patriots of two towns (Amherst and North-ampton) had been assembled and two regiments were ready for action.
        Captain Lewis Clark with Mary Berkeley and 300 men was to capture Amherst, whereas Captain Matthew Ashley with Rebecca Coleridge and 400 regulars was to take Northampton. Finally, after the conquest of Greenfield, Amherst and Northampton, the patriot army was to move towards Springfield.
        Sarah Dillon and 700 patriots under the command of Major James Wilkinson (22) were at Springfield and they were waiting for them.
        In all, American army marshalled a contingent of 2,200 between men and women, whereas the British army had about 3,000 regulars detached in the four towns.
        *****
        British military superiority and discipline were indisputable, but the Americans were unerring shooters. All was ready. The attack had been decided on April 10.
        That morning and icy wind was blowing from the north and the troops moved. The army of 500 men under the command of Abigail stormed the fortress of Greenfield, where about 800 soldiers under the command of Major William Carrington had been marshalled round the town; it was a preventive move because there were a lot of spies in the region and they had warned British headquarters of possible attacks of the rebels.
        On April 9, American patriots arrived few miles from the village; they encamped in neighbouring woods and they waited for the signal.
        At dawn of 10, Abigail Seymour mounted her white steed (horse), she sounded her hunting horn and the 500 patriots threw themselves against the enemy. The detestable Colonel Anthony Fletcher ordered his dragoons to attack, while the artillerymen began shelling those desperates with a battery of four guns placed on the east side of the town.
        “Someone betrayed us!”, Abigail cried. “They were waiting for us! Shelter yourselves!”.
        The destiny of the rebellion was turning to the British advantage, but suddenly a British soldier saw a dark crowds; they were advancing from west towards the small town of Western Massachusetts. General Horatio Gates had gone across the Connecticut River with an army of about 5,000 men. He had sent General Charles Lee (23) with 3,000 American regulars towards the other towns.
        The battle increased in intensity and in brief the British laid down their arms. Greenfield was a free town now; the guns were in the hands of the Americans, the British officers were taken prisoners and the few British surviving soldiers managed to flee through the woods southwards. Colonel Fletcher only escaped capture, but he will soon meet with the blade of Abigail Seymour’s sword.
        *****
        Mary Berkeley, Rebecca Coleridge and Sarah Dillon were waiting; the women knew British defeated at Greenfield were making for their towns because they were far from the sea and they were thinking to join the other headquarters located in the three towns.
        On April 10, at six in the afternoon, the first fugitives entered into Amherst; they were received by an army of women armed with sticks and pots filled with boiling water. Mary Berkeley and her 150 patriot women overwhelmed the army of stragglers; the women beat, burnt and kicked them; and the same fate will have the British will enter into Northampton three days later and those who will free towards Springfield the fol-lowing week because Rebecca Coleridge and Sarah Dillon will fight valiantly.
        *****
        Americans won the battle. Amherst was a free town, Major Carrington was taken pris-oner, but perfidious Colonel Fletcher, the British officer who had ordered to burn Abi-gail Seymour’s house, was still free.
        The patriot woman chased him and after two days she found him on the Connecticut River banks; he was going to sail and he took with him ten men. When he saw the woman, he ordered his soldiers to fire. Abigail was escorted by five patriots and they overwhelmed the British patrol; then she prepared for the final encounter.
        Fletcher drew his sword and two blades crossed. Abigail Seymour was a skilful swordswoman (fencer) and the due was brief.
        “You have burnt down my home, lewd Britisher!”, she yelled with rage.
        The woman fought with fury; the British officer was dripping with sweat; he began drew back and he fell on his knees; the buttons of his red jacket were cut off by the ter-rible blade of the patriot woman. Fletcher struck a desperate blow, but Abigail’s sword put an end to his life; he fell into the river.
        *****
        Amherst. Abigail Seymour had returned home; she was tired and disheartened. The woman got off her horse; she noted a slight scratch on her left arm; it had been caused by Fletcher’s sword; and she gazed at the burnt remains of her humble home. Suddenly she heard a voice.
        “Abigail!”.
        General Horatio Gates was few yards from her; he was riding a sorrel horse.
        The patriot woman turned towards him. “Horace … you are … here,” she cried; her heart was full of joy.
        The American officer got off his horse and ran to meet his wife; his arms were powerful and he hugged and kissed her with passion.
        “Gail, war here is over at least!”, he said.
        While the love scene was going to come to an end, the primitive Rufus Allen rode westwards; tears were streaming down his face; he disappeared among the woods he always loved.

        THE END

        AUTHOR’S NOTES

        (1) CONNECTICUT RIVER.
        The Connecticut River rises on the Salmon Mountains, northern New Hampshire; it flows southwestwards and it marks the western border between New Hampshire and Vermont; it enters Western Massachusetts and it crosses the State from north to south; then it enters Connecticut and it cuts in half the State from north to South; it flows into the Atlantic Ocean.
        (2) HIS MAJESTY.
        King George the Third (1738-1820). He became the king of Britain in 1760 and he was the main symbol of British oppression towards the Americans.
        (3) LEXINGTON AND CONCORD CLASHES (APRIL
        19, 1775).
        The villages of Lexington and Concord lie to the northwest of Boston, Massachusetts. The American Revolution started here.
        (4) BUNKER HILL.
        Bunker Hill lies to the to the northwest of Boston, Massachusetts, between the Mystic and Charles Rivers. On June 17, 1775 the British under the command of General Wil-liam Howe attacked the Americans. Rebels under the command of Colonel William Prescott ran out of the gunpowder and they were forced to retreat.
        (5) DISASTER AT FORT WASHINGTON.
        On November 16, 1776, General William Howe and about 13,000 British soldiers at-tacked Fort Washington in Manhattan area, New York; they defeated about 3,000 Americans under the command of Colonel Robert Magaw.
        (6) CONTINENTAL ARMY.
        The Continental Army was made up of 88 battalions. It was established by Congress on September 16, 1776.
        (7) TRENTON.
        Capital of New Jersey; it lies in the central-western part of the State, on the banks of Delaware River. On December 26, 1776, General George Washington defeated about 1,000 Hessians under the command of Colonel Johann Rall.
        (8) PRINCETON.
        Princeton lies in central-western New Jersey, to the northeast of Trenton. On January 3, 1777, General George Washington defeated 1,200 British soldiers unfer the command of Lieutenant-Colonel Charles Mawhood.
        (9) MINUTEMEN.
        Continental Army’s volunteers during the American Revolution. On April 19, 1775, about 70 of them attacked the British. The British regulars were marching towards Con-cord (Massachusetts) to seize military depots.
        (10) JOHN PARKER.
        Captain John Parker, Minutemen’s commander of Massachusetts.
        (11) QUARTERING ACT (1765).
        Act passed by the British Parliament in 1764. On March 24, 1765, it came into force in America. It required colonies to quarter British troops and to supply them with food and other necessities. On June 2, 1774, the act was extended to colonists’ houses and wher-ever barracks were inadequate.
        (12) HORATIO GATES.
        American officer of British origin; he was born in Maldon, England, April (?) 1728(?). He was the son of Robert Gates, a custom collector and Dorothy Reeve, an house-keeper. In 1745, he was commissioned through the Duke of Bolton and he was ap-pointed first standard-bearer in the Twentieth Regiment, then lieutenant in the regiment Duke of Bolton recruited privately. Gates was sent to Germany as an aide of the regi-ment. In 1749 he joined Colonel Edward Cornwallis as an aide-de-camp and he moved with colonel to Nova Scotia (Canada). In 1754 he married Elizabeth Phillips; they had one child. In 1755 he was promoted captain and he was sent to New York. At the out-break of the Seven Years’ War (1756-63), he was seriously wounded during an ambush to General Edward Braddock (July 9, 1755), near Fort Duquesne (present Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania). In 1758 he was promoted major in a brigate under the command of Gen-eral John Stanwix and in 1761 he took part in an expedition against Martinique (an is-land in the Little Antilles, Central America) under General Robert Monckton’s orders. After his return to England, in 1772 he moved with his family to Virginia. At the out-break of the American Revolution, Congress appointed him brigadier general in the Continental army (June 17, 1775) and the following winter he took part with George Washington in Boston siege. On May 16, 1776, he was promoted major general and in June Congress entrusted him with the command of Fort Ticonderoga (New York) and he prevented Guy Carleton from controlling Lake Champlain and capturing the fort. On December 2, he began marching with 600 men from North Castle (New York) to Dela-ware River to join George Washington. In the summer of 1777, British General John Burgoyne began the New York campaign and Gates first defeated the British of Bur-goyne at Freeman’s Farm (September 19, 1777) then General Samuel Fraser at Bemis Heights (October 7, 1777). On July 25, 1780, he took command of Southern Depart-ment, but on August 15, while he was marching towards Camden, South Carolina, he was attacked and defeated by Lord Charles Cornwallis. After the war and his wife’s death (1783), in 1786 he married Mary Vallance, a rich widow and moved to Manhat-tan, New York. In 1787 he became a strong supporter both Constitution and Thomas Jefferson and in 1800 he was elected to the New York legislature. Horatio Gates died in Manhattan on April 10, 1806.
        (13) FREEMAN’S FARM AND BEMIS HEIGHTS.
        Battles fought in New York State on September 19 and October 7, 1777 respectively.
        (14) DRAGOONS.
        The light cavalry.
        (15) RED COATS.
        Epithet the Americans gave to the British soldiers.
        (16) HARPSICHORD.
        An old keys instrument like the piano and spinet.
        (17) “SONS OF LIBERTY” OF BOSTON.
        Members of a patriotic organization. It was founded in the American colonies in 1765 and it opposed the Stamp Act passed by the British Parliament on March 22, 1765. The act provided that all newspapers, legal documents, pamphlets, almanacs, playing cards and dice were to bear a stamp.
        (18) GREENFIELD.
        Greenfield lies in Northwestern Massachusetts on the banks of Connecticut River.
        (19) AMHERST.
        Amherst lies in Central-Western Massachusetts to the east of Connecticut River and to the southeast of Greenfield.
        (20) NORTHAMPTON.
        Northampton lies in Central-Western Massachusetts to the west of Connecticut River and to the southwest of Amherst.
        (21) SPRINGFIELD.
        Springfield lies in Southwestern Massachusetts, on the banks of Connecticut River and to the southeast of Northampton.
        (22) JAMES WILKINSON.
        American officer; he was born in Calvert County, Maryland, in 1757. He was the son of Joseph Wilkinson and Betty Heighe, merchants and farmers. He began studying medi-cine and, at seventeen (1774), he moved to Philadelphia (Pennsylvania) where he con-tinued his studies. The following year he returned to Maryland and he opened up a sur-gery at Monocacy. At the outreak of the American Revolution, he was appointed an aide-de-camp of General Nathanael Greene and in 1776 he joined Benedict Arnold in Canada and he was promoted first captain and then major. In January 1777, he became a member of the staff of General Horatio Gates with the rank of lieutenant colonel and af-ter Gates’ victory at Saratoga (New York, October 17), Congress promoted him briga-dier general and Secretary of Department of War. In 1781, he married Ann Biddle, the daughter of a Quaker merchant; they had three sons. In 1783, after he had been a farmer in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, he moved to Kentucky where first he purchased a large estate near Lexington with the money of his family’s wife, then he set up a big commer-cial enterprise, then he devoted himself to the birth of Kentucky State. In 1791, he was appointed lieutenant colonel of the United States Army and he was sent in Northwest Territory (present Ohio, Indiana and Illinois) to fight against the Indians. The following year, after Anthony Wayne had been promoted commander-in-chief, Wilkinson was ap-pointed brigadier general and second-in-command. In 1794, he took part in the battle of Fallen Timbers (Ohio, August 20) and in 1796, after Wayne’s death, he took command of the Army. In 1798, he was transferred to the South and in 1805 he was appointed Governor of Louisiana. At the outbreak of War of 1812, Wilkinson was promoted major general and in November of 1813 he tried to invade Montreal (in present Quebec, Can-ada), but with no success; the operation put an end to his military career. In 1816, he moved to New Orleans (Louisiana) with Celestine Laveau Trudeau, his second wife; he had married her in 1810 and they had had two daughters. In 1822, with little money, he moved to Mexico City in order to get some lands in Texas. James Wilkinson died in that city on December 28, 1825.
        (23) CHARLES LEE.
        General in the American Revolution; he was of British origin and he was born in Ches-ter, England, on January 26, 1731. He was the son of John Lee, a colonel in the Fifty-Fifth Infantry Regiment and Isabella Bunbury. In 1745, at fourteen, he was appointed standard-bearer in the same regiment; then he will become the Forty-Fourth. On May 1, 1751, after his father’s death (1750), he was commissione lieutenant; in 1754 he moved from Ireland to America and he took part in the French and Indiar War (1754-63) be-tween France and England, but they think he was not with the Forty-Fourth regiment during the ambush to General Edward Braddock (July 9, 1755) near Fort Duquesne (present Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania). In fall 1755, he married the daughter (name un-known) of White Thunder, a Seneca chief; they had two children (one son and one daughter). On June 11, 1756, he was commissione captain in the Forty-Fourth regiment and in 1757 he took part in an expedition against the French af Fort Louisburg on Cape Breton Island (Nova Scotia, Canada). On July 1, 1758, he was seriously wounded dur-ing an unsuccessful assault on Fort Ticonderoga (New York) and he was transferred to Long Island. On September 8, 1760, after his recovery, he joined General Jeffrey Am-herst in an attack on Montreal (in present Quebec, Canada). On August 10, 1761, after his return to England, he was promoted major in the 103rd Regiment and in 1762 he moved to Portugal, where he was appointed lieutenant-colonel in the Portuguese army in order to fight against the Spanish invaders; he defeated them in the battle of Villa Velha on October 5, 1762. In 1765 he moved to Poland where he took part in the Polish civil war; he fought alongside the Russian king Stanislaus Augustus. In 1769, with the rank of major general in the Russian army, he fought against the Turks. On October 8, 1773, Lee arrived in America (New York) where in the following months he will meet patriots such as George Washington, Patrick Henry and John Adams. In May of 1775, he purchased and estate in Berkeley County, Virginia (present West Virginia) near the house of his friend Horatio Gates and on June 17 Congress appointed him second major general in the Continental Army; he was in command in Boston, Massachusetts, until December of 1775, then from December to March of 1776, he was in Newport, Rhode Island, and in New York City where he assembled citizens and prepared defenses. In February of 1776, Congress entrusted him with command of an army in Canada, but on March 1 the order was withdrew; afterwards he was sent to the South where on March 29 he took command of a Continental army in Williamsburg, Virginia; he organized here Virginia and North Carolina defenses. On June 28, 1776. he repulsed a British at-tack at Fort Moultrie, South Carolina, but in August he returned to New York and he re-joined George Washington’s army. After the battle of White Plains (New York, October 28), the disaster at Fort Washington (New York) on November 16 and the American re-treat across New Jersey, Lee reached Basking Ridge (New Jersey, December 12) where he was taken prisoner by the British; they took him to New York. In April of 1778, he was released and on June 28 he attacked the British at Monmouth (New Jersey), but he was forced to retreat and the operation put an end to his military career. On January 10, 1780, he retired his home in Virginia. Charles Lee died in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on October 2, 1782.

        (C) 2003
        a short story written by:
        FARMER JOHN

        Reply
  30. Larry (Lorenzo Bernardotto - It.) says:

    This time the subject is the Jacksonian Era. And indeed I have a book entitled “GLI STATI UNITI NELL’ETA’ DI JACKSON” (The United States in Jacksonian Era, 1987), edited by Prof. Loretta Valtz Mannucci who taught American history at the University of Milan. This book is a collection of essays. The first one has been written by ANTHONY WALLACE, and it deals with “THE LAST CAMPAIGN OF THE ENLIGHTENMENT. The second essay has been written by PERRY MILLER, known by historians and scholars of colonial history for his book entitled “The New England Mind: The Seventeenth Century”, (1939). The title of his essay here is “THE GREAT AWAKENING”. But MILLER has also written the third essay entitled “A PROFESSION IMPOSES ITSELF”. The fourth essay, written by DAVID GRIMSTED is entitled “THE TURMOIL OF THE JACKSONIAN WORLD. The fifth essay has been written by Lee Benson and it’s entitled “THE CONCEPT OF ‘JACKSONIAN DEMOCRACY’ IN NEW YORK”. The sixth one, written by SEAN WILENTZ, author of “Andrew Jackson”, (2005) and “The Rise of American Democracy: Jefferson to Lincoln”, (2005) is entitled “AMERICAN REPUBLICANISM: XENOPHOBIA, MUTUAL ASSISTANCE, AND FREEDOM IN NEW YORK CITY”. Another famous historian, RONALD FORMISANO, has written the seventh essay entitled “SOCIAL MOVEMENT AND THE FORMATION OF MASS PARTIES IN MASSACHUSETTS”. The eighth essay, written by WILLIAM COOPER, JR., is entitled “THE POLITICAL ARENA IN THE SOUTH (1828-1856). J. MILLS THORTON, III, has written the ninth essay entitled “POLITICS AND POWER IN A SLAVE SOCIETY: ALABAMA, 1800-1860”. The tenth one is arisen from the pen of GILBERT HOBBS BARNETT, entitled “THE MOVEMENT AGAINST SLAVERY”. Another scholar, LEONARD RICHARDS, has written the eleventh essay entitled “THE ANTI-ABOLITIONIST CROWD: VIOLENCE AND ITS OVERCOMING. The twelfth and last essay has been written by CARL KAESTLE, and is entitled “THE IDEOLOGY OF THE STATE SCHOOL REFORM IN ANTE-BELLUM PERIOD”. This book is the second which belongs to a collection of books printed in Bologna and part of my “historical and personal course”.

    Reply

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